East German “Taigatrommeln” in North Korea

With the Koreas in the news headlines at the moment, I thought I’d take the opportunity to explore a story that has interested me for some time.

Elsewhere on this site I have asserted that the remaining class 143 electrics are the only (standard gauge) locos built for the former East Germany that remain in passenger service – however this is a little disingenuous on my part!  It’s almost certain that there are more.

Following the withdrawal of the final examples by the nascent Deutsche Bahn in the mid-1990s, 31 class 220 diesel-electrics – Russian-built “M62” locos formerly known as Deutsche Reichsbahn class 120, not to be confused with the former Deutsche Bundesbahn class 220 diesel-hydraulics – were exported to North Korea, where by all accounts they remain in front-line service.

DPRK_M62_Naeyeon_706

An ex-DR M62, now numbered 내연 706 at Pyongyang on 05/10/13 (Photo: Clay Gilliland from Wikipedia used under Creative Commons licence)

North Korea

The country known as North Korea – officially the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea – came into existence as a result of Japan’s surrender at the end of the Second World War; when the USA occupied the southern half of the Korean peninsula and the USSR the north.  Separate governments were established in 1948, with North Korea under the leadership of Kim Il-Sung – although it is still not universally recognised as a state, notably by France.  Korean hostilities have continued ever since, but if the headlines are to be believed, a peace treaty can be looked forward to later in 2018.

We in the West have an image of the “hermit kingdom” as a very secretive and possibly even paranoid land, but really we know very little about it, and that certainly fuels a great deal of interest in it.  The UK government currently advise against “all but essential” travel there – although accompanied guided tours do occur, including ones tailored to a railway interest.

North Korea does have a fairly extensive railway network, a lot of which was constructed during the years of Japanese occupation.  It certainly suffered in the same way as Poland, East Germany et al in terms of the Russians dismantling infrastructure to transport it back to the USSR to use it there.  On top of that, extreme damage was caused to what remained during the Korean War.  Although the Russians did not play an active role in that conflict, they played a very major one in North Korea’s post-war reconstruction, and this included its railways.

M62s in North Korea

As briefly touched on in this article (ostensibly about the Swedish-built NoHABs supplied to Hungary in 1963), the standard Russian medium-power diesel locomotive from the early 1960s was its “M62” type – 2,000 hp diesel-electrics with Kolomna power units.  Comecon rules dictated that this rugged, spartan design was to be a “one size fits all” solution for any of the Comecon nations’ railway administrations that wanted a diesel loco in that power bracket.  Consequently, they were supplied to Hungary, East Germany, Czechoslovakia, Poland, Mongolia and Cuba as well as domestically.  North Korea was not a Comecon member, but it did hold official “observer” status, and as part of the Russian effort to help rebuild the North Korean railways, they had a fleet built too.

Between 1967 and 1974, 64 class “K62” (the Korean version of the M62) locos were built in Voroshilovgrad for North Korea – 59 standard gauge, and 5 broad gauge to be used on the routes around Tumanggang at the Chinese border.  The Koreans named these new locos “Sinsŏng”.

In the 1970s, the North Koreans reverse engineered one of the K62s, and then set about building their own “ersatz” version, the Kŭmsŏng class.

In the late 1990s, as a result of severe economic problems (brought about in no small part by the collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe) partly restricting the availability of fuel for diesels and partly also prohibiting the repair of some of the diesels in the poorest condition, some members of both the Russian and North Korean-built fleets were converted to electric locos – the Kanghaenggun class (see photo here).

European Exports

With a requirement for diesel locomotives, but the economic situation prohibiting the construction of new ones, North Korea employed a creative solution.  With the post-1989 age seeing many of the Eastern European M62s laid up in favour of newer traction, and this type being the existing basic diesel traction of North Korea, they looked to import some of the recently-withdrawn machines.

Between 1996 and 1998, 31 class 220s were sent from Germany to North Korea (220 008 / 043 / 048 / 086 / 087 / 114 / 119 / 159 / 180 / 211219 / 234289 / 290292 / 296 / 305 / 317318 / 319322 / 332 / 334 / 335 / 342 / 345 / 362 / 367 / 371 / 372 / 375).

In 2000, 13 Polish class ST44s followed – (ST44 72 / 103152325518 / 549649673 / 840 / 929 / 937 / 947 / 999).

These locos have been renumbered into the 내연 7xx series, although I haven’t (yet) seen any details of how their new identities correspond to their old ones.

In addition, nine Slovakian class 781s made the move in 2000, which along with some ex-Russian machines are numbered in he 내연 8xx series.

Although travelling to experience these locos is not the easiest or even perhaps the wisest thing to do, it is at least nice to think that they are continuing to ply their trade long after they would otherwise have been cut up.

 

Have you ever been to North Korea?  (Even better, have you travelled on any of the trains over there, or have any further information on these locos?).  Please do leave me a comment below!

Halle (Saale) route S7 – East German nostalgia

Loco haulage on this route finally ended on 11th April 2018, but I’ll keep the article on the website for posterity as it has been popular – even though the S7 is now worked solely by EMUs, you may still like to visit this interesting corner of the former DDR!

Ironically, “Ostalgia” is big business.  Nearly 30 years after German reunification, nostalgia for communist East Germany has never been more popular. 

It seems that, with almost as much haste as the traces of the former country were wiped away following the fall of the Berlin Wall, people are now scrambling to experience what life was like behind it.  You can drive a Trabant car in convoy around East Berlin on an innovative sightseeing tour, then stay at painstakingly-styled themed hotels.  You can purchase clothes, food and all manner of other items of “reborn” Communist brands, recreated by popular demand.  You can have your photo taken at Checkpoint Charlie in front of a replica border hut, with men dressed up as border guards.

Yet all of these experiences are in some way synthetic. This part of the world has experienced so many changes since the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, that it is nigh on impossible to recreate “everyday life” in any setting.  After all, this was a country where you could realistically expect your intercity train to be powered by steam right up until the late 1980s.  Today you can flash through the Sachsen-Anhalt countryside on some of the world’s most modern trains at speeds of up to 300 km/h.

IMGP5297.JPG

143 043 arrives at Halle Silberhöhe, 30/09/13 (JW)

A small, but nonetheless very interesting exception exists in the vicinity of Halle (Saale), approximately 20 miles west of the city of Leipzig.  Halle (Saale) is a city with a history visibly stretching back centuries, and there is plenty for the tourist to see there.

The area around Halle is known as big centre for the chemical industry, with both the famous Leuna and Buna plants a short distance away.  These two gained particular importance in the post-war period when they were expropriated, expanded as part of the 1958 “Chemieprogramm” and used to supply the Soviet Union, jointly employing up to 50,000 people between them (equating to 1 in 350 of all the citizens of East Germany).

The mushrooming of industry here, the need for people to work there and the poor quality of housing elsewhere (much of it badly damaged by war) led to a fascinating East German project – the conception of a completely new and thoroughly modern city, known initially as the “Chemiearbeiterstadt West” (“Chemical Workers’ City – West”).  Later refined to “Halle-Neustadt”, this was to be a short distance to the west of the existing city.  Construction began on 15th July 1964 under the watchful eye of the architect Richard Paulick who oversaw the project.

“The laying of the foundation stone of Neustadt in 1964 was also that of the Halle S-Bahn network” Ralf Jacob, Halle city archivist

In stark contrast to the 700-year-old buildings of Halle, Neustadt was a futuristic (for the time) settlement consisting largely of grey concrete tower blocks known as “Plattenbauten”, synonymous with East Germany, designed to home over 90,000 people in total in nine Wohnkomplexe (“living complexes”).  Perhaps bizarrely, none of Halle-Neustadt’s streets apart from the main drag (the “Magistrale”) had any names – each block was identified by a number only – although this is one thing that has since changed.  Each Wohnkomplexe was intended to be pretty self-sufficient, featuring shops, restaurants etc, but the city’s primary function of a dormitory for the chemical workers was very close to the surface.

IMGP5304.JPG

Basher’s eye view of 143 871 on the S7, 30/09/13 (JW)

Key to this was the creation of a public transport infrastructure to link the residential districts with each other, the chemical plants and also the original city of Halle.  The centrepiece of this was the S-Bahn, the first part of which opened in 1967.

Halle S-Bahn

It may perhaps be a little odd to the 2017 observer to consider that this S-Bahn – a term we now largely associate with rapid transit operated by electric multiple units – was initially operated with Deutsche Reichsbahn V180-type diesel-hydraulic locos (later class 118, and DB class 228 after reunification) with up to 12 double-decker carriages in push-pull formation.  These ran from the station now known as Halle Zscherbener Straße to Merseburg, Luna and Beuna and were supplemented by VT2.09 “pig taxis” to Halle (Saale) Hbf.

Electrification was soon to follow, along with new stations in the south of Halle-Neustadt as the city sprawled ever outwards and an extension through the Halle-Neustadt station (situated underground beneath the centre of the new city) through to Halle-Nietleben and Halle-Dölau.  This allowed an electric S-Bahn service to be operated in an inverted “S” shape through the adjacent cities, beginning at Halle-Trotha and ending at Halle-Dölau – a distance of 22.8 km by rail, but less than 7 km as the crow flies.  Traction for this was initially classes E11 and E42 (later DB class 109 and 142) electrics – as seen here in a rather impressive photo from after the fall of the Wall – and later the once-ubiquitous class 143 electric locos.

IMGP5282.JPG

143 871 at Halle (Saale) Hbf, 30/09/13 (JW)

Halle-Neustadt Today

Halle-Neustadt’s initial strength has also proved to be its downfall.  Conceived to home chemical workers, the plants are now shadows of their former selves, and this has had the predictable knock-on effect.

Home to 93,000 people at its peak, the turn of the century had seen Halle-Neustadt’s population reduce to 60,000, and now barely 40,000 live there.  A startlingly high ratio of those people are the old people who were the young target market of the project 50 years ago.  Many of the Plattenbauten lie empty, including those originally built for the families of the Soviet soldiers who built them.  Consequently, some have even been demolished.  Doubtless more will follow as the population gets older.  Some modernisation has occurred – including to Halle-Neustadt’s S-Bahn station which retained this dilapidated throwback as late as 2009 – but generally, its East German character can still be very clearly seen.

Neither the direct link from Halle-Neustadt to Merseburg (2007), nor the section of line beyond Halle-Nietleben to Halle-Dölau (2002) retain a train service – although part of the latter saw its first train in 15 years in April 2017 when the Freunde der Halle-Hattstedter Eisenbahn ran a track machine along it (see news article here).  For the meantime, though, the S7 route through Halle-Neustadt remains a little picture of a lost country.

The above is a link to a 9-minute YouTube video uploaded by user Berger Max neatly showing life on the S7 route in 2017.  The deplorable state of Neustadt station can clearly be seen.

Halle S7 today – loco-hauled

The S7 is the remainder of the Trotha to Dölau route, now cut back to serve only Halle (Saale) Hbf to Halle-Nietleben.  The section from the Hbf to Trotha has now been subsumed into an EMU-worked S-Bahn route from Leipzig.

Using East German traction (class 143) and East German-built double deck rolling stock, and running through as East German an environment as you are likely to find in 2018, this is probably as authentic as “Ostalgic” experience as any you could have.

Halle retains an allocation of five class 143s (143 034143 276, 143 810143 871 and 143 903) and the S7 represents 100% of their remaining booked work.  This is now an oasis in a desert of suburban loco haulage – modern class 442 “Talent” EMUs having recently replaced locos on all but this route – although January 2018 has seen a couple of impromptu vice-unit appearances by 143s on route S9.

Two sets are employed on the route, operating at 30-minute intervals (xx:20 and xx:50 from both ends).  If you simply wish to travel on both in the shortest time possible, then the “shack of choice” is Halle-Silberhöhe – you can depart from Hbf at xx:20, be at Silberhöhe from xx:28-33.  This +5 is guaranteed to “make”, as Silberhöhe is a single-platform station.  (It does, however, have the appearance of a former island platform – with a second platform face and ballast, but no track – this was never in fact laid, and was part of an uncompleted project to allow a 10-minute frequency along this route in the 1980s, such was the amount of usage that the line was getting).

This will get you back at the Hbf with both machines in your book by xx:41.  (To note, these trains now use the new platform 13a at the Hbf, which is a few minutes’ – signposted – walk from the main station).  However, if you have the time, I really would recommend a little wander into Halle-Neustadt.

Update 31/03/18 – From 18/04/18, the RE9 “Rhein-Sieg-Express” in the Köln area will have two class 442 “Hamster” EMUs replaced by two loco-hauled “Dosto” sets.  It is expected that these will be the two sets from Halle currently used on the S7.  This will mean that the 442s will move to Halle to work the S7, giving a common fleet in that area.  I would not expect the 143s to move with the stock, so if you want to ride behind them, best to move quickly…

The 230km/h Trabant!

DSC02114 (3)

One of Europe’s fastest locomotives wears a unique livery prominently featuring the unmistakable shape of the infamous 23hp East German “Trabant” car.  What’s it all about?

182 509 is a Siemens ES64U2-type loco, built in 2002 for their own spot-hire business, “Dispolok”, which was bought out by MRCE in 2006.

It was one of two such machines (182 509 and 182 560) to get unique specially-designed liveries – different on each side – in summer 2014, to mark the impending 25th anniversary of the fall of Communism in Europe.  182 560’s was dedicated to the fall of the Berlin Wall, whereas 182 509’s was on the theme of the “Pan-European Picnic”, arguably a lesser-known event.

DSC02113 (2).JPG

182 509 livery detail, seen on 05/05/17 (JW)

So, what was the “Pan-European Picnic” and what is the livery all about?  As I described in my article on the Flüchtlingszüge from Prague, 1989 saw burgeoning unrest through the Communist states behind the Iron Curtain, and history tells us that this resulted in the systematic collapse of the regimes in each of these countries by the end of the year.  It was a watershed year but these momentous events were characterised not by shows of aggression (except in Romania) but by demonstrations of peace.

One of the main characteristics of Eastern Europe in 1989 was the gathering pace of Mikhail Gorbachev’s policy of perestroika, of not interfering in the internal affairs of the Communist states.  It was in this climate that the Hungarian Minister of State Imre Pozsgay and the Austrian Otto von Habsburg, an MEP and President of the International Pan-European Union, sponsored an event to be held near Sopron, a Hungarian town near to the Austrian border, on Saturday 19th August 1989.

The theory was that the border between Hungary and Austria would be opened for a few hours, allowing people from both sides of the Iron Curtain to mingle, eat together (i.e. the picnic) and generally show that despite decades of propaganda to the contrary, those on both sides of the previously impregnable border between ideologies were not so different.

DSC02109 (2).JPG

182 509 livery detail, seen on 05/05/17 (JW)

What was not planned for, however, was the additional attendance of 600 enterprising East Germans who had been on their summer holidays in Hungary, had heard about the event and had decided to seize their opportunity to escape to the West.  The border guards turned a blind eye to this and their “Republikflucht” had been successful.

Again, history informs us that the border between Hungary and Austria was finally opened properly on 11th September and East Germans headed there in their droves in an attempt to leave – and (again, as described here) the dominoes had begun to fall that eventually resulted in the breach of the Berlin Wall – hence the liveries on 182509 and 182560 each commemorate events that neatly book-end what are probably the most significant twelve weeks in European history in the second half of the 20th century.

And what of the “230km/h Trabant” in the title?  These little two-stroke cars, manufactured by VEB Sachsenring in Zwickau, were ubiquitous in East Germany.  They were the vehicles that East German families drove in to Hungary in their attempts at escaping, that were left abandoned on the streets of Prague as their owners crammed into the West German Embassy, and that smokily and noisily inched across the Berlin Wall when it was first opened on that landmark night in November 1989.  As a result, Trabants became one of the most instantly-recognisable symbols of the events of 1989, and so it’s entirely appropriate that one is included in this design.  The irony is that a vehicle that struggled to hit 100km/h in real life can now be “seen” flashing through the German countryside at well over double that!

DSC02107 (2).JPG

182 509, Stuttgart Hbf, 05/05/17 (JW)

So, where is the best place to see the “Pan-European Picnic” loco?  As a Dispolok machine, it lives a somewhat nomadic existence, but since it gained its special livery it has worked predominantly for DB (both on regional passenger services for DB Regio, and on Intercity expresses for DB Fernverkehr) but, since January 2017, it has been hired to the Swedish firm of Hector Rail.

Although Hector Rail is based in Sweden, 182 509 is as yet only passed for use in Germany and Austria.  As well as a number of freight flows across the former, Hector Rail have the contract to provide motive power for the crowd-funded open-access train operator Locomore, which have operated a Stuttgart to Berlin and return passenger service since December 2016.  Although 182 517 has worked the lion’s share of these trains to date, 182 509 did have a stint of a several days working this in May 2017, which is when the photos in this article were taken.

DB “Ludmillas” – current status

232583

232 583 at Szczecin Glowny, 17/05/12 (JW)

One of the most popular European diesel locomotive types is the “Ludmilla” family; powerful machines built in the Soviet Union for the Deutsche Reichsbahn of East Germany.  Of a total fleet of 873 locos, only 242 are thought to remain extant – roughly a sixth of which have now left Germany.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

One of the machines now in Romania is 232653, seen here at Berlin Schönefeld Flughafen on a very long freight train, 21/04/06 (JW)

This article is not intended as a history of these locos, although I am in the process of writing one.  Rather, this is a roll-call of those that have survived to the current date (01/05/17), with details of where they can now be found, plus dates of recent photographs and sightings, with links to them.

This list is correct and up-to-date to the best of my knowledge, but trying to keep tabs on several hundred locomotives spread across the continent can be like herding cats – so if you’re aware of any corrections required, please let me know!

DR Class 130 / DB Class 230

130 002 Interessengemeinschaft Bw Dresden-Altstadt, Dresden, Germany Static Display 17/04/2016
130 012 PHU Lokomotiv Bronisław Plata, Podegrodzie, Poland Spare Parts
130 077 Bahnlogistik 24 GmbH, Dresden, Germany – as 230 077 Operational 24/02/2016
130 101 BSW-Gruppe Traditionsgemeinschaft Bw Halle, Halle (Saale), Germany Operational 05/07/2015

DR Class 131 / DB Class 231

131 001 BSW-Gruppe Traditionsgemeinschaft Bw Halle, Halle (Saale), Germany Static Display 03/07/2010
131 011 ArcelorMittal Eisenhüttenstadt Transport GmbH, Eisenhüttenstadt, Germany – as 232 107 Operational
131 012 Wedler Franz Logistik GmbH, Germany – as 231 012 Operational 22/04/2017
131 015 STRABAG, Berlin, Germany – as 232 105 Operational 06/12/2016
131 034 Ecco Rail, Będzin, Poland – as BR231-063 Operational 17/11/2016
131 050 stored at Neustrelitz Works, Germany – as 231 050 Stored
131 056 Orion Kolej, Z.P., Nowy Sącz, Poland – as BR232-035 Operational 27/01/2017
131 060 Sächsisches Eisenbahnmuseum, Chemnitz-Hilbersdorf, Germany Static Display 29/08/2015
131 070 Privately owned, Falkenberg, Germany – as 231 070 Static Display 13/09/2009
131 072 Bahnbetriebswerk Arnstadt, Germany Static Display 19/09/2015
131 075 Ecco Rail, Będzin, Poland – as BR231-014 Operational 26/07/2015

DR Class 232 / DB Class 232, 233, 234 and 241

232 004 Leipziger Eisenbahnverkehrsgesellschaft, Leipzig, Germany – as 132 004 Operational 06/04/2017
232 005 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 30/03/2017
232 008 Starkenberger Baustoffwerke GmbH, Starkenberg, Germany – as 241 008 Operational 27/04/2017
232 010 Thüringer Eisenbahnverein, Weimar, Germany – as 132 010 Static Display 30/05/2015
232 022 DB Cargo Romania, Romania – stored at Constanta Spare Parts
232 040 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 040 Operational 27/08/2016
232 043 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany – as 233 043 Stored
232 045 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 20/02/2017
232 049 Pol-Miedź Trans, Poland – as BR232-049 – badly damaged at Bolesławieci, 30/07/2015? Scrapped? 12/04/2013
232 050 Przedsiębiorstwo Obrotu Surowcami Wtórnymi „DEPOL”, Bydgoszcz, Poland – as BR232-781 Operational 13/04/2017
232 055 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany Stored
232 057 ArcelorMittal Eisenhüttenstadt Transport GmbH, Eisenhüttenstadt, Germany – as 232 850 Operational 24/01/2017
232 068 Leipziger Eisenbahnverkehrsgesellschaft, Leipzig, Germany – currently as MEG 313 Operational 04/03/2017
232 072 Wedler Franz Logistik GmbH, Germany – as 232 901 Operational 21/12/2016
232 073 Przedsiębiorstwo Obrotu Surowcami Wtórnymi „DEPOL”, Bydgoszcz, Poland – as BR232-789 Operational 21/07/2016
232 076 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany – as 233 076 Stored
232 079 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 22/02/2017
232 083 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany Stored
232 088 EfW, Frechen, Germany Operational 24/01/2017
232 090 Rail Time Polska, Warszawa, Poland – as BR232-090 Operational 13/10/2016
232 092 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 29/03/2017
232 093 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 25/04/2017
232 096 Unknown, last reported at Eisenach ??
232 103 Leipziger Eisenbahnverkehrsgesellschaft, Leipzig, Germany – stored at Delitzsch Stored 02/04/2017
232 104 PUK Kolprem, Dąbrowa Górnicza, Poland – as BR232-037 Operational 11/06/2016
232 105 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 28/03/2017
232 109 Leipziger Eisenbahnverkehrsgesellschaft, Leipzig, Germany – as 132 109 Operational 20/04/2017
232 112 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 112 Operational 28/07/2016
232 117 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 29/04/2017
232 118 DB Cargo, stored at Hamm, Germany – as 233 118 Stored
232 122 DB Cargo Romania, Romania – as 651 010 Operational 18/01/2014
232 127 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 127 Operational 01/07/2016
232 128 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 10/09/2016
232 131 unknown ?? 01/12/2016
232 135 DB Cargo Romania, Romania – as 651 013 Operational 25/03/2017
232 141 Wedler Franz Logistik GmbH, Germany Operational 19/04/2017
232 151 DB Cargo, stored at Hamm, Germany – as 233 151 Stored
232 154 Przedsiębiorstwo Obrotu Surowcami Wtórnymi „DEPOL”, Bydgoszcz, Poland – as BR232-561 Operational 27/12/2016
232 155 Starkenberger Güterlogistik GmbH, Starkenberg, Germany – as V300 005 Operational 07/04/2017
232 158 Leipziger Eisenbahnverkehrsgesellschaft, Leipzig, Germany – as 132 158 Operational 23/12/2016
232 161 DB Cargo, stored at Hamm, Germany – as 232 902 Stored
232 170 DB Cargo, stored at Hamm, Germany – as 232 903 Stored
232 173 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany Stored
232 176 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 176 Operational 22/10/2016
232 179 DB Cargo, stored at Halle (Saale), Germany – as 233 179 Stored 29/04/2017
232 182 Leipziger Eisenbahnverkehrsgesellschaft, Leipzig, Germany – stored at Delitzsch Stored
232 184 Exported to Poland, future user TBC Stored 19/03/2017
232 189 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 14/02/2017
232 201 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 18/03/2017
232 206 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany – as 233 206 Stored
232 209 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 13/11/2016
232 217 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 217 Operational 15/02/2017
232 219 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 219 Operational 01/03/2017 + rep. wkg. on DSO 21/04/17
232 223 DB Gleisbau, Germany Operational 02/12/2016
232 227 Ecco Rail Sp. z o.o. g, Będzin, Germany – as BR232-446 Operational 11/05/2016
232 229 Leipziger Eisenbahnverkehrsgesellschaft, Leipzig, Germany – stored at Delitzsch Stored 29/07/2016
232 230 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 26/04/2017
232 232 DB Cargo, stored at Halle (Saale), Germany – as 233 232 Stored 16/02/2017
232 233 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 233 Operational 27/03/2017
232 238 Leipziger Eisenbahnverkehrsgesellschaft, Leipzig, Germany Operational 28/03/2017
232 239 Erfurter Bahnservice, Erfurt, Germany Operational 11/04/2017
232 240 DB Cargo, stored at Halle (Saale), Germany Stored 07/12/2013
232 241 DB Cargo, Germany Operational
232 242 DB Cargo, stored at Mukran, Germany – as 234 242 Stored 19/11/2014
232 249 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany – as 233 249 Stored
232 252 DB Cargo, stored at Nürnberg Rbf, Germany Stored
232 253 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany Stored
232 254 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 20/04/2017
232 255 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 11/04/2017
232 259 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 04/02/2017
232 262 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 03/02/2017
232 264 DB Cargo, stored at Hamm, Germany – as 233 264 Stored
232 265 DB Cargo Bulgaria, Bulgaria (stored at Pirdop?) Stored? 22/09/2014
232 278 DB Cargo, stored at Mukran, Germany – as 234 278 Stored
232 280 DB Cargo, stored at Halle (Saale), Germany Stored 16/02/2017
232 281 DB Cargo, stored at Mukran, Germany – as 233 281 Stored 19/09/2015
232 283 Wedler Franz Logistik GmbH, Germany Operational 09/03/2017
232 285 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 285 Operational 12/04/2017
232 288 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 288 Operational 10/04/2017
232 289 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany – as 233 289 Stored
232 293 Erfurter Bahnservice, Erfurt, Germany Operational 11/02/2017
232 294 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 24/04/2017
232 295 DB Cargo, stored at Hamm, Germany – as 233 295 Stored
232 303 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 31/03/2017
232 304 Interessengemeinschaft Dampflok Nossen e.V., Nossen, Germany (permanent loan by DB Museum) – as 234 304 Static Display 11/10/2015
232 305 Dampflok-Museum Hermeskeil, Germany Static Display
232 306 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 306 Operational 02/02/2017
232 309 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 20/04/2017
232 314 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 314 Operational 17/02/2017
232 320 DB Cargo, stored at Cottbus, Germany – as 232 904 Stored 24/01/2017
232 321 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 321 Operational 16/06/2016
232 322 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 322 Operational 03/11/2016
232 326 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany – as 233 326 Stored
232 330 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 22/10/2016
232 333 Wedler Franz Logistik GmbH, Germany Operational 26/04/2017
232 334 Erfurter Bahnservice, Erfurt, Germany – as 132 334 Operational 13/04/2017
232 338 Starkenberger Baustoffwerke GmbH, Starkenberg, Germany – as 241 338 Operational 20/04/2017
232 347 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 24/01/2017
232 353 Erfurter Bahnservice, Erfurt, Germany – as 241 353 – stored at Delitzsch Stored 02/04/2017
232 356 Wedler Franz Logistik GmbH, Germany Operational 06/12/2016
232 358 DB Cargo, stored at Rostock Seehafen, Germany Stored
232 359 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany Stored
232 367 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 367 Operational 31/03/2017
232 372 Mecklenburgische Eisenbahnfreunde Schwerin, Germany – as 132 372 Static Display 06/05/2013
232 373 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 373 Operational 19/08/2016
232 375 Privately owned, Falkenberg, Germany Static Display 09/10/2016
232 384 DB Cargo, stored at Cottbus, Germany Stored 24/01/2017
232 387 Schienen Güter Logistik GmbH, Germany – as V300.18 / 232 446 Operational 25/03/2017
232 388 DB Cargo, stored at Hamm, Germany Stored 17/03/2016
232 401 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 22/10/2016
232 404 Starkenberger Güterlogistik GmbH, Starkenberg, Germany – as V300 001 Operational 26/10/2016
232 405 Starkenberger Güterlogistik GmbH, Starkenberg, Germany – as V300 002 Operational 04/10/2016
232 408 Orion Kolej, Z.P., Nowy Sącz, Poland – as BR232-408 Operational 29/10/2016
232 409 DB Cargo, Germany Operational
232 411 DB Cargo Bulgaria, Bulgaria Operational 12/03/2017
232 413 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany Stored
232 416 Leipziger Eisenbahnverkehrsgesellschaft, Leipzig, Germany Operational 21/04/2017
232 423 unknown – as 232 905 ?? 01/12/2016
232 426 DB Cargo, stored at Hamm, Germany Stored
232 428 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 27/04/2017
232 429 Starkenberger Güterlogistik GmbH, Starkenberg, Germany – as V300 004 Operational 03/11/2016
232 434 Unknown, last reported at Nymburk ???
232 441 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany – as 233 441 Stored
232 443 Ecco Rail, Będzin, Poland – as BR232-443 Operational 13/10/2014
232 448 Exported to Poland, future user TBC Stored 19/03/2017
232 449 Starkenberger Baustoffwerke GmbH, stored at Halle (Saale) (or Cottbus?), Germany – as 241 449 Stored 24/01/2017
232 450 DB Cargo, stored at Hamm, Germany – as 233 450 Stored
232 451 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany – as 233 451 Stored
232 452 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 452 Operational 29/03/2017
232 453 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany Stored
232 457 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany Stored
232 458 DB Cargo, stored at Hamm, Germany – as 233 458 Stored
232 461 DB Cargo, stored at Mukran, Germany Stored 19/09/2015
232 469 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 28/04/2017
232 472 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 16/02/2017
232 478 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 478 Operational 22/04/2017
232 484 DB Cargo, Germany (possibly now stored at Cottbus?) Operational? 29/03/2017
232 486 DB Cargo, stored at Hamm, Germany – as 233 486 Stored
232 489 Mitteldeutsche Eisenbahn GmbH, Schkopau, Germany – as 315 Operational 16/04/2017
232 493 DB Gleisbau, Germany – as 233 493 Operational 09/03/2017
232 498 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 21/03/2017
232 500 Dampflokfreunde Salzwedel, Wittenberge, Germany Static Display 25/03/2017
232 502 DB Cargo, stored at Cottbus, Germany Stored 24/01/2017
232 504 DB Cargo, stored at Cottbus, Germany – as 232 906 Stored 06/09/2014
232 505 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany Stored
232 510 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 510 Operational 30/08/2016
232 511 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 511 Operational 20/04/2017
232 512 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 13/04/2017
232 515 DB Cargo, stored at Mukran, Germany – as 233 515 Stored 19/09/2015
232 519 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany Stored
232 521 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 521 Operational 24/08/2016
232 524 DB Cargo, stored at Hamm, Germany Stored Scrapped 08/2018
232 525 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 525 Operational 02/07/2015
232 527 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany Stored
232 528 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 31/08/2016
232 529 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany Stored
232 531 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 13/04/2017
232 534 DB Cargo, stored at Mukran, Germany Stored
232 535 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany Stored 19/09/2015
232 536 DB Cargo, stored at Mukran, Germany – as 233 536 Stored
232 537 Orion Kolej, Z.P., Nowy Sącz, Poland Operational 08/09/2016
232 541 DB Cargo Romania, Romania – as 651 001 Operational 04/08/2013
232 543 GySEV, Hungary – as 651 002 Operational 08/08/2016
232 547 DB Cargo, stored at Mukran, Germany – as 233 547 Stored 19/09/2015
232 550 DB Gleisbau, Germany Operational 22/04/2017
232 559 DB Cargo Romania, Romania – as 651 003 Operational 08/08/2015
232 561 Leipziger Eisenbahnverkehrsgesellschaft, Leipzig, Germany – stored at Delitzsch Stored 29/07/2016
232 562 DB Cargo, stored at Mukran, Germany – as 233 562 Stored 19/09/2015
232 567 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 25/04/2017
232 568 DB Cargo, stored at Mukran, Germany Stored 19/09/2015
232 569 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 26/04/2017
232 571 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 25/08/2016
232 572 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 572 Operational 20/04/2017
232 579 DB Cargo Romania, Romania – as 651 014 Operational 18/08/2016
232 583 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 04/03/2017
232 586 DB Cargo, stored at Hamm, Germany – as 233 586 Stored
232 587 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 05/04/2017
232 588 DB Cargo, stored at Hamm, Germany – as 233 588 Stored
232 589 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 07/11/2016
232 592 DB Cargo, stored at Cottbus, Germany Stored 24/01/2017
232 596 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany – as 233 596 Stored
232 598 DB Cargo Romania, Romania – as 651 004 Operational 20/09/2015
232 600 DB Cargo Bulgaria, Bulgaria Operational 21/04/2017
232 601 Wedler Franz Logistik GmbH, Germany Operational?
232 609 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 26/08/2016
232 613 DB Cargo Bulgaria, Bulgaria Operational 19/06/2016
232 614 DB Cargo Romania, Romania – as 651 005 Operational 09/06/2015
232 616 DB Cargo, stored at Hamm, Germany – as 233 616 Stored
232 617 DB Cargo Romania, Romania – as 651 006 Operational
232 618 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 19/11/2016
232 622 DB Cargo, stored at Mukran, Germany – as 233 622 Stored 19/09/2015
232 625 DB Cargo, stored at Mukran, Germany – as 233 625 Stored 19/09/2015
232 635 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 27/08/2016
232 636 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 636 Operational 11/08/2016
232 643 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany – as 233 643 Stored
232 652 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany – as 233 652 Stored
232 653 DB Cargo Romania, Romania – as 651 015 Operational 23/05/2015
232 654 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 16/02/2017
232 657 DB Cargo, Germany – as 232 909 Operational 19/08/2016
232 658 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 11/04/2017
232 660 Protor SA, Zabrze, Poland – as BR232-660 Operational 06/11/2016
232 662 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 662 Operational 24/08/2016
232 663 DB Cargo Bulgaria, Bulgaria Operational 29/01/2017
232 665 DB Cargo, stored at Cottbus, Germany Stored
232 668 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 16/02/2017
232 669 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 29/04/2017
232 673 Leipziger Eisenbahnverkehrsgesellschaft, Leipzig, Germany Operational 20/04/2017
232 678 DB Cargo Bulgaria, Bulgaria Operational 04/07/2016
232 682 GySEV, Hungary – as 651 008 Operational 28/01/2017
232 683 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany – as 233 683 Stored
232 684 Starkenberger Güterlogistik GmbH, Starkenberg, Germany – as V300 003 Operational 11/03/2017
232 685 DB Cargo Romania, Romania – as 651 009 Operational 26/08/2014
232 689 DB Cargo, stored at Mukran, Germany – as 233 689 Stored 19/09/2015
232 690 Mitteldeutsche Eisenbahn GmbH, Schkopau, Germany – as 318 Operational 20/03/2016
232 693 DB Cargo, stored at Mukran, Germany Stored 19/09/2015
232 696 DB Cargo, stored at Cottbus, Germany – as 233 696 Stored 24/01/2017
232 697 Starkenberger Baustoffwerke GmbH, Starkenberg, Germany – as 241 697 Operational 19/04/2017
232 698 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 698 Operational 05/01/2017
232 699 DB Cargo, Germany – as 232 908 Operational 19/04/2017 + rep. wkg. on DSO 30/04/17
232 701 Leipziger Eisenbahnverkehrsgesellschaft, Leipzig, Germany – stored at Delitzsch Stored 29/07/2016
232 703 DB Cargo, Germany Operational 24/04/2017
232 704 DB Cargo, stored at Chemnitz, Germany Stored 05/01/2013
232 705 DB Cargo, stored at Mukran, Germany – as 233 705 Stored 19/09/2015
232 709 DB Cargo, Germany – as 233 709 Operational 20/04/2017

DR Class 242/ DB Class 142

142 001 EKO-Trans (Arcelor Mittal), Eisenhüttenstadt, Germany – as 242 001 Operational 16/03/2017
142 002 Hafen Halle GmbH, Halle-Trotha, Germany – as 232 002 Operational 28/06/2015
142 003 Captrain, Wroclaw, Poland – as BR232-01 Operational 12/11/2016
142 004 Captrain, Wroclaw, Poland – as BR232-04 Operational 12/10/2016
142 005 Pozbruk, Rokietnica, Poland – as BR232-003 Operational 07/03/2017

 

232 387

Today, there are two 232s that carry variations of the number “232446”, but neither of them are the original!  SGL (Schienen Güter Logistik GmbH)’s V300.18, the UIC number of which is 92 80 1232 446-5 D-SGL, is the body of 232387 with the innards donated by the real ‘446.  More confusingly, the former 232227, now working for Ecco Rail in Poland, carries “BR232-446”. The SGL machine is seen here on an engineers train at Esslingen, near Stuttgart, 28/11/15 (JW)